General Networking

Who you know is as important in the publishing industry as in any other. If you want to get published, next to becoming a fantastic writer is becoming a fantastic networker.

The following resources can help you with initial feedback, making friends, learning about conferences and events, keeping your finger on the pulse of the publishing industry, and keeping up-to-date on the best strategies for getting published. You might also try a writing organization to find a local chapter’s writing group for your genre.

Dive into the resources below, but be warned:  most people can smell an opportunist a mile away. If you are not sincerely interested in helping others and making friends, you’ll likely burn bridges rather than build them. Using people just to promote your work is a no-no with live and online networking both.

With that caveat, check out these networking resources:

Writer’s BBS is the International Writers Community and hosts active forums and writing challenges.

Authonomy.com is an online forum where writers can upload manuscripts for free to get feedback from other writers, readers, and industry professionals. The site was developed by editors at HarperCollins, who have been known to read some of the manuscripts and make offers if they like what they see.

Authors Incognito is a group that was started at the LDStorymakers annual conference. Visit the blog and the site.

American Night Writers Association is all about LDS women writers supporting each other and networking.

Segullah.org is a literary magazine for LDS women writers.

My Writers Circle offers reviews for all sorts of genre, including poetry and scripts.

LiteraryMama.com is for writing mothers.

Twitter.com lets you follow writers, agents, publishers, etc. Take part  in #litchat, #writerwednesday, #storyfriday, etc.

Facebook.com lets you connect with other writers as well as agents, editors, and publishers, and make announcements about news in your career or invite others to your writing events and promotions.

Community.WritersDigest.com is like Facebook, only specifically for writers.

Bksp.org features and news from industry insiders. There is a fee, but it might be well worth it if it leads to publication.

Ed2010.com is a community of young magazine editors who offer advice, post journalism opportunities, and suggest networking events.

Freelancewritinggigs.com is a community for freelancers; it offers leads and advice on every topic relevant to the writing career.

Librarything.com is a network for book lovers, so introduce your book there and get to know writers, agents, and editors by what they love—a good resource for scouting out what an agent wants to read before sending in a manuscript.

Goodreads.com is also a network for book lovers, so again, introduce your book there and get to know writers, agents, and editors by what they love—a good resource for scouting out what an agent wants to read before sending in a manuscript.