Finding an Agent

First, you should know what an agent does—or should do—so you know you’ve found a good one; so check out this short podcast, then explore the resources below to query the right fit for you:

Preditors & Editors Protect yourself against potential scams. This site confirms who is trustworthy and who might not be. For example, legitimate agents will not charge you a fee to look at your work. They make their living off a percentage of your royalties once they’ve successfully represented you.

Writer Beware is one of the publishing industry’s most respected watchdogs in identifying shady agents.

Twitter.com This is just one more place to follow writers, editors, agents, publishers, and literary journals. Try following #litchat, #writerwednesday, and #storyfriday.

AgentQuery.com is a free database where writers can search for agents.

AAROnline.org The Association of Authors’ Representatives is a not-for-profit organization of ethical agents.

QueryTracker.net Track your queries and find an agent on the site’s extensive list.

MacGregor Literary The right agent to turn to for help in promoting your work in the Christian market.

Authonomy.com is an online forum where writers can upload manuscripts for free to get feedback from other writers, readers, and industry professionals. The site was developed by editors at HarperCollins, who have been known to read some of the manuscripts and make offers if they like what they see.

LibraryThing.com is a network for book lovers, so introduce your book there and get to know writers, agents, and editors by what they love—a good resource for scouting out what an agent wants to read before sending in a manuscript. (Sometimes what an agent represents and buys isn’t his/her favorite sort of read, but comparing their favorite-reads list to their “what-I-represent-list” should make that clear.)

Goodreads.com is also a network for book lovers, so again, introduce your book there and get to know writers, agents, and editors by what they love—a good resource for scouting out what an agent wants to read before sending in a manuscript. (Sometimes what an agent represents and buys isn’t his/her favorite sort of read, but comparing their favorite-reads list to their “what-I-represent-list” should make that clear.)